Ceramics / Craft / Curating Design / Curator / design process / Everyday Objects / Indira Barve / Nature / Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen / Pottery / Teapots

Treasure of Teapots – Meissen 1720 to 1760

Tea pots are fascinating and complex form of pottery, the form can be experimented with to give a a variety of charming, and sometimes surprising results. In this series ‘Treasure of Teapots’ I will be sharing with you the tea pots I found at Rijks Museum, Amsterdam. All photographs are courtesy of Rijks Museum and Meissen website.

Teapot 1740 Rijks museum

Teapot 1740 Rijks museum

The Bird Spout – flower teapot as I call it, was the first to catch my eye (Teapot with lid, multicolour painted with Kakiemon decor, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1735) It is by the Porcelain Manufacture Meissen, and I have put together a few teapots by the same manufacturer during the 1700 to 1760 period. The distinct style of the wishbone handle and the spout set it apart from the other manufacturer in the same time period. I searched further back in time to find references to the development of these features, I did find a couple of teapots to show the development

Teapot, multicolor painted with chinoiserie, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1725 - ca 1730

Teapot, multicolor painted with chinoiserie, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1725 – ca 1730

This teapot was made in 1725, The suggestion of a wishbone handle seems to begin here

Teapot 1720 Rijks Museum

Teapot 1720 Rijks Museum

In 1720 teapot the wishbone handle is absent and so is the animal spout, with a classic spherical pot, beautifully painted with flowering branches and insects motif

Teapot 1715,  Meissen

Teapot 1715, Meissen

The 1715 teapot here, shows a very elaborately decorated pot, subsequent style moves away from bird form to a suggestion, which I think is far more attractive.

Teapot, multicolor painted with chinoiserie, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1725 - ca 1730

Teapot, multicolor painted with chinoiserie, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1725 – ca 1730

Teapot, multicolor painted with chinoiserie, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1725 – ca 1730, This particular style seemed to be popular for some years.

Teapot with lid, multicolor painted with chinoiserie, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1725 - ca 1730

Teapot with lid, multicolour painted with chinoiserie, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1725 – ca 1730

Teapot with lid, painted with Imari decoration, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, 1730

Teapot with lid, painted with Imari decoration, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, 1730

The three teapots shown above are bottom heavy, with a different spout, after this brief period the design of the teapot went back to the classic pot.

Teapot with lid, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, anonymously, 1730

Teapot with lid, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, anonymously, 1730

Teapot with lid, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1730 - ca 1735

Teapot with lid, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1730 – ca 1735

The Silhouette motif on a opaque background of the teapot sphere, is quite unique motif for this period. The craftsmen of the firm were very experimental with style of the pots and the kind of motifs, as if trying to find a brand style. The Handle here has developed into a better grip, indicating their attention to detail, and a small scroll appears at the top of wishbone handle.

Teapot, multicolor painted with water landscapes , Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1735

Teapot, multicolour painted with water landscapes , Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1735

Teapot, multicolour painted with water landscapes , Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1735. We see European landscapes feature on the teapot, moving away from the chinoiserie motif which were very popular during that time, imitating the Chinese porcelain which was far more expensive and difficult to obtain. The handle has changed again to a simpler form.

Teapot, multicolor painted with water landscapes ,Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1735

Teapot, multicolour painted with water landscapes ,Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1735

The style and the colour combinations are the same , the bird spout appears here along with the wishbone handle ( same as the 1740 teapot above) This combination of pot form, spout and handle was repeated, while the motifs changed.

Teapot with lid, multicolor painted with bouquets, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1740 - ca 1750

Teapot with lid, multicolour painted with bouquets, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1740 – ca 1750

Teapot 1740

Teapot 1740

Teapot with lid, painted in under-glaze blue with leafy branches, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1750 - ca 1760

Teapot with lid, painted in under-glaze blue with leafy branches, Porzellan Manufaktur Meissen, ca 1750 – ca 1760

Teapot 1755, Meissen Teapot 1755, Meissen[/caption]

Globular form, wishbone handle with appliqué palmettes and tubular spout culminating in sculptural animal’s head. Slightly domed inset lid, central flower finial. On sides, diverse applied flowers along with insects in flight and at rest. Colourfully painted.
In about 1735, Kaendler began encrusting porcelain ware with leaves and sculptural flowers that were not generally embellished with colour. In November of that year, for instance, he designed a covered bouillon cup encrusted with roses for Princess Wilhelmina of Prussia. There subsequently followed further vessels of this kind such as his écuelle, in which not only are the sculptural flowers colourfully decorated but individual floral motifs and insects have been inserted in the plain areas in between.

Teapot 1765, Meissen

Teapot 1765, Meissen

By 1765 the form had gone to classic, with a simple spout and a rope handle, with “Peasant scenes in naturalistic landscape” in the manner of Teniers.

The Unique teapot in this time period, which looks almost contemporary is the one shown below, everything about it says design

Unique Teapot 1735,  Meissen

Unique Teapot 1735, Meissen

http://www.meissen.com/en/search/apachesolr_search/teapot

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